Blog

Jun
30
Conservation of Yves Klein Blue

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VENUS BLUE DAMAGE (left) AFTER CONSERVATION TREATMENT (right)


The majestic deep shade and brilliance of the ultramarine blue pigment has conquered the heart of artists and viewers of the Western world since the medieval illuminated manuscripts from c.1100. ‪Natural Ultramarinus (lapis lazuli), which literally means: "beyond the sea” was imported from Asia, more specific from the quarries of Badakhshan, northeastern Afghanistan. According to Marco Polo’s description, the finest blue azuri “…appears in veins like silver streaks”. Due to its vibrant shade, unmatched by any other blue, the pigment was more valuable than gold during the 13th century and beyond. Renai...


Jun
08
Conserving WPA Murals in Key West City Hall

by Viviana Dominguez, Chief Conservator, Art Conservators Lab


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Jun
03
Oct
09
Art Conservation Viviana Dominguez . Before and After Treatment Photos

"Untitled" Pierre August Renoir


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Before Treatment

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Detailed of damaged surface
"Untitled" (1947) Serge Ivan Chermayeff

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Before Treatment

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After Treatment
“Untitled” (1963)Tikashi Fukushima

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Before Treatment



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After Treatment
Portrait of Maria T Rojas (1943) by Wifredo Lam

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Before Treatment
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“Euterpe” (1973) Ralph Iwamoto
After Treatment

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Before Treatment

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After Treatment
"Untitled" Stivenson Magloire

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BeforeTreatment

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After Treatment
"Mdme Roux" Max Pinchinat

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Before Treatment

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After Treatment
"Old Lady" Mario Benjamin

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"Marche Aux Fleur" by Eduoard Cortes

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After Treatment
Wilshire Building Art Deco Decorative Ceiling

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Before Treatment

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Feb
22
The Journey to Recovery: A Tale of Earthquake Damage and Repair in Haiti

The eighteen-month long Smithsonian Institution Haiti Cultural Recovery Project was an international, collaborative, conservation effort to recover cultural patrimony gravely damaged by the January 12, 2010 earthquake. As Chief Conservator and Paintings Conservator, respectively, Stephanie directed conservation activities to support projects at twenty public and private institutions, and Viviana oversaw the paintings conservation activities. Here we relate the story of one remarkable conservation treatment and its context, the recovery of a fragmented Stivenson Magloire painting, mentioned in an earlier blog post here on The Bigger Picture.


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Jan
20
Conservation of Paintings-Smithsonian Institution Haiti Cultural Recovery Project. by Viviana Dominguez: art.conservation.services@gmail.com

temp-post-imagePhoto: From left to right Erntz Jeudy, Jean Menard Derenoncourt and Viviana Dominguez.


Thousands of paintings have been rescued from the rubble of collapsed museums and galleries in Port-au-Prince after the devastating earthquake of January 2010. The artwork was brought to the Smithsonian Institution’s Haiti Cultural Recovery Center (CRCH) to be conserved by US professionals under the direction of Chief Conservator Stephanie Hornbeck.


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Mar
19
Feb
25